Camping Skills

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Online Resource - Outdoor Adventure Skills - Camping Skills - Competencies & Requirements

Contents

Stage 1 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can collect small sticks for a campfire.
    • Scouts can search for and return with some dry sticks for starting a campfire.
    • Scouts can separate tinder, lightweight sticks and logs.
  2. I can follow directions while at camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the ability to successfully follow simple instructions.
  3. I can help pack a bag for camp.
    • Scouts can assist with the packing of a bag for camp.
    • Scouts can unpack their bags and then re-pack them, explaining what they are doing.
  4. I can keep my camping gear neat and tidy.
    • Scouts can demonstrate in a camp setting how to keep things tidy to maintain safety and comfort. Scouts can describe what would happen in adverse weather conditions if their gear was left untidy.
  5. I can care for my basic personal gear on an overnight camp.
    • Scouts can explain how to check the condition of basic personal gear and show how to care for it.
    • Scouts can explain the impact on their safety if their gear is not working (for example, if the batteries in their flashlight are not fresh).
  6. I can explain the use of the buddy system at camp.
    • Scouts can describe the buddy system and how and why it is important to use at camp.
  7. I can describe the different emergency services in the camp area and how to call them.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to call emergency services when an accident takes place on a camp.
    • Scouts can explain the information they will need to provide to the emergency responder.
  8. I can set out my sleeping area for good night’s sleep at camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to roll out a sleeping bag, pillow and sleeping mat and show that their sleeping area is organized and tidy.
  9. I have spent one night at camp.
    • Scouts have attended their first camp (possibly the ‘family camp’ described in BP&P).

Stage 2 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can explain the importance of following directions at camp.
    • Scouts can explain why and how they must listen to instructions, and how to ask for clarification if they don’t understand.
  2. I can list what personal gear to bring on an overnight camp.
    • Scouts can list the items they need to bring with them for an overnight camping event, including clothing and personal care items.
  3. I can look after all my personal gear while at camp.
    • Scouts can describe the value of camping equipment and demonstrate how to go about checking and caring for equipment.
    • Scouts can explain safety implications of poor or dysfunctional camp equipment.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to keep personal camp equipment in working order.
    • Scouts can show when items of camp equipment are in need of repair.
    • Scouts can describe the quality of different items of camp equipment.
  4. I can explain what clothing to bring on an overnight camp.
    • Scouts can describe what clothes they need to bring for different weather conditions.
  5. I can explain how to use Canada’s Food Guide at camp and help to plan a nutritious meal.
    • Scouts can give examples of foods in each food group.
    • Scouts can give examples of what makes a serving from the basic food groups and can show where to locate the required servings for their age group as outlined in the guide.
    • In a group setting, Scouts can use the guide to help plan a nutritious meal.
  6. I can describe safe food handling and hygiene at camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate at camp how to store food safely. Scouts can demonstrate how to properly wash their hands.
    • Scouts can maintain a clean working area while working with different types of food.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to prevent spoilage when there is no electricity and how to cover and protect foods and surfaces.
  7. I can help prepare food for cooking at camp and be safe while cooking at camp.
    • Working in a team (or with an experienced cook) Scouts can demonstrate how to clean and prepare various food items and how to check that food is cooked thoroughly.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to use knives safely when cutting food items.
    • Scouts can use proper techniques when lifting hot liquids.
    • Scouts can use proper techniques when lifting hot pots and pans.
  8. I can get help if someone is hurt while at camp.
    • Scouts can recognize serious injuries and demonstrate how to ask for help.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to call 911 or their local emergency number and can request assistance from the nearest adult.
  9. I can get a weather forecast for a camp.
    • Scouts can access information from the appropriate weather forecasters in their area.
    • This could be from websites, television weather channels or news broadcasts, radio stations or phone apps.
  10. I can identify the main parts of a tent.
    • Scouts can identify the tent, fly, poles and pegs.
  11. I can help pitch a tent at camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate putting up a tent with other Scouts.
  12. I behave safely around fires at camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate care and safety around fires.
    • Scouts can state basic fire safety rules at camp: no horseplay, poking at the fire; keeping at a safe distance; follow instructions of the person in charge of the fire.
  13. I can identify and explain the elements of the fire triangle.
    • Scouts can explain each part of the fire triangle (fuel, heat, oxygen) and demonstrate the role of each element in a good fire.
  14. I have spent two nights in a tent at camp.
    • Scouts spend at least two nights camping while completing this stage.

Stage 3 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can help others learn about camping.
    • Scouts display a willingness to help others learn in a natural way over a period of time, rather than mount a single display of expertise.
  2. I can audit my personal gear for camp.
    • Scouts show an awareness of the value of camping equipment.
    • Scouts can explain that if equipment is not working properly, it is likely to fail in bad weather conditions.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to go about checking and caring for equipment.
    • Scouts can explain the safety implications of poor or dysfunctional equipment.
    • Scouts can keep personal equipment in working order. Scouts can demonstrate how to repair items of equipment.
  3. I can pack a bag for camp.
    • Scouts can present a packed bag for inspection.
    • Scouts can demonstrate and discuss, while unpacking and repacking:
      • The value of the method used in the packing process
      • The necessary equipment to pack
      • Where to place soft items
      • Where to place heavy items
      • Where to place food
      • What is meant by “first in, last out”
      • What wet weather equipment to bring
  4. I can help plan a basic balanced meal for camp.
    • Scouts can plan a meal using the guidelines of Canada’s Food Guide.
  5. I can demonstrate how to store food at camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the proper methods to keep food safe in camp (using food containers and/or coolers as required).
  6. I can assist in cooking a meal at camp.
    • Scouts can assist in the cooking of a meal in a camp setting.
  7. I can be safe while cooking at camp.
    • Scouts can use pots safely to prevent tipping.
    • Scouts can use protective equipment or utensils while working with hot items while cooking.
  8. I can demonstrate first aid treatment for a minor cut or scratch at camp and explain how to prevent infection and describe the signs of infections.
    • Scouts can clean a small wound.
    • Scouts can apply a bandage to wound.
  9. I can describe how weather can affect our camp.
    • Scouts can explain the different types of weather likely to occur in the area they plan to travel to, given the time of year.
    • Scouts can explain what will happen if it rains in the camp area. Scouts can explain what will happen if it is very hot.
    • Scouts can explain what extra gear they need to bring (just in case).
  10. I can discuss the seven principles of Leave No Trace.
    • Scouts discuss a basic knowledge of the principles of Leave No Trace and how they affect the way groups camp.
  11. I can show how to pitch a tent (with help from others).
    • Working with a team, Scouts can demonstrate how to properly pitch a tent.
  12. I can make a hot drink on a campfire at camp.
    • Scouts can make a hot drink on an open fire with cooking pots.
  13. I can clean up a fire area after camp.
    • Scouts can clean up the pit, wood pile and area around the fire pit.
  14. I have spent seven nights at camp.
    • Scouts have spent at least four nights camping while completing this stage.
    • Scouts have spent at least two consecutive nights at camp while completing this stage.

Stage 4 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can demonstrate shared teamwork while at camp.
    • Scouts can participate in camp as full members of the Patrol.
    • Scouts can play a number of roles while on camp and generally add to the wellbeing of the whole Patrol.
  2. I can list the personal gear for standing camp.
    • Scouts can indicate (in list form) the items of clothing they need to bring with them for various camping activities over a number of days for a standing camp.
    • Scouts can show consideration of proper clothes provision for wet weather.
    • Scouts can explain the benefit of the equipment design as it relates to a standing camp.
  3. I can show how to use group gear safely at camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to correctly use any of the individual items of group gear.
  4. I can show proper use, care and maintenance of group gear during and in between camps.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to go about checking and caring for equipment, considering:
      • Safety implications of poor or dysfunctional equipment
      • Keeping personal equipment in working order
      • How to repair items of equipment
      • The quality of different items of equipment
  5. I can use basic camp tools safely.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to use a tool correctly and are aware of any safety implications.
      • Be able to use a tool correctly to do the job it was designed for
      • Display your skill in using a particular tool
  6. I can store and cook food safely at camp.
    • Scouts can describe the type of containers best suited for a camp setting to keep food away from animals.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the proper methods to store containers while in camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate when and how to use methods such as hanging food containers to prevent animal access.
    • Scouts can demonstrate proper food safely in a camp setting.
  7. I can demonstrate how to treat cuts and minor burns and prevent infection at camp.
    • Scouts can clean and treat wounds using appropriate methods for the injury.
    • Scouts can apply an appropriate bandage to a wound to promote proper healing.
  8. I can explain and demonstrate the seven principles of Leave No Trace while at camp.
    • Scouts can name the seven principles of Leave No Trace and apply each of the principles at camp.
  9. I can find the best place to pitch a tent at camp and explain my reasoning.
    • Scouts can explain what kind of terrain is good for pitching a tent. Examples include:
      • Level ground
      • Rocky ground
      • Near/away/on hill
      • Shady
      • Sunny
      • Close or away from trees
  10. I can assist pitching tent with my team at camp.
    • Working with a team, can demonstrate how to properly pitch a tent.
  11. I can demonstrate safe practices around fires and cooking equipment to minimize the risk of burns, scalds and other injuries.
    • Scouts can demonstrate a consistent and high level of fire risk management behaviour.
  12. I have spent 12 nights at camp.
    • Scouts have spent at least four of the twelve nights camping while completing this stage.

Stage 5 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have assisted in the organization of two camps for my team or others.
    • Scouts have actively assisted in the planning of two separate camps for their team or others.
  2. I can assist in planning a camp program of activities.
    • Scouts can actively assist the person in charge of planning the activities at a camp.
  3. I can show the personal gear needed for an overnight lightweight camp.
    • Scouts can indicate (in list form) the items of clothing they need to bring with them for various camping activities over a number of days for a lightweight camp.
    • Scouts can explain factors to consider for proper clothes and provision for wet weather.
    • The weight of the pack is also a concern; Scouts can describe weight-saving measures.
    • Scouts can explain the benefits of the chosen equipment design as it relates to lightweight camping.
  4. I can explain how the type of camp affects the choice of equipment needed.
    • Scouts can list the Patrol equipment necessary for a variety of camps.
    • Scouts can discuss how each item is relevant and what safety equipment is required.
    • With regards to a lightweight camp, Scouts can discuss how the load might be distributed among the party.
  5. I can use, maintain and store tools safely at camp.
    • Scouts can show how to properly maintain and care for the tools being used at camp.
    • Scouts know how to store the tools for use at another time.
  6. I can teach another Scout what to pack for a camp.
    • Scouts can mentor other Scouts such that they have successfully completed the packing requirements for Stages 1-4.
  7. I can plan a balanced menu for camp with a team.
    • Scouts can create, with a team, a well-balanced menu plan for a weekend camp.
  8. I can demonstrate how to use different cooking methods (with different fuel types) at camp.
    • Scouts can use at least two different types of cooking fires.
    • Scouts can explain the advantages and disadvantages of different stoves.
    • Scouts can build and use two types of cooking fires to cook a meal. Scouts can properly use two different types of camp stoves.
  9. I can prepare for and help prevent heat-, cold- and sun-related injuries at camp.
    • Scouts can describe heat and cold injuries such as sunburn, frostbite, hypothermia, etc.
    • Scouts can describe proper activity levels and clothing to prevent heat-, cold- and sun-related injuries.
    • Scouts can seek help for any of the above conditions.
  10. I can describe the weather forecast and record the weather for the duration of camp.
    • Scouts can use the weather information they have researched and present it to their Troop Leader and to the Troop in general in a clear, concise fashion that it easy to understand.
  11. I can demonstrate the appropriate measures for minimizing and dealing with food waste, solid waste and human waste, in keeping with Leave No Trace principles.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the proper way to deal with garbage and camping refuse and how to dispose of it correctly.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the proper method of dealing with kitchen and human waste in a wilderness environment.
  12. I can pitch a variety of tents and shelters.
    • Scouts can pitch lightweight tents, standing tents, lean-tos, tarps, etc.
  13. I can demonstrate measures to secure tents for inclement weather.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to set up a tent properly for rainy, snowy or windy conditions—considering tie-down and staking techniques.
  14. I can select a suitable location for standing/ lightweight camp.
    • Scouts can select a location for the camp based on type (standing/ lightweight lightweight/hike-in/etc.).
  15. I can show the best layout for a campsite and explain my reasoning.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how and where camp equipment is set up at a campsite (i.e. kitchen, tents, shelter, chopping area).
  16. I can light, maintain and use a fire to cook a balanced meal at camp.
    • Scouts can prepare a complete meal (not just one menu item).
  17. I have spent 18 nights at camp.
    • Scouts have spent at least six of the 18 nights at camp while completing this stage, including one night of lightweight camping.

Stage 6 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can teach camping skills with my team at camp.
    • Scouts can teach others on their team new camping skills while at a camp.
  2. I can plan and lead a weekend camp.
    • Scouts can be responsible for the planning and implementation of all aspects (transportation, site location, menu, equipment) of a two-night camp.
  3. I can plan a program of activities for camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate knowledge of the different types of activity that are possible on the campsite and how best to maximize the opportunities they present.
    • Timetabling and equipment considerations need to be displayed.
  4. I can assist with the organization of transportation to camp.
    • Scouts can actively assist the person responsible for organizing transportation for a camp.
  5. I can explain group emergency equipment for a camp.
    • Scouts are safety aware and can discuss realistic possible emergency situations.
    • Scouts can explain the type of equipment that is present on the campsite.
  6. I can demonstrate to others how to care for, store and maintain group gear for camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate basic procedures for cleaning and caring for equipment.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to clean, care for and store tools, tents and cooking equipment.
  7. I can prepare a list of personal and group gear required for a standing camp.
    • Scouts can prepare a list of personal and group gear for a standing camp, including all required tools, portable shelters (tarps and tents), cooking equipment, emergency equipment, and all other optional or recommended items.
  8. I can help plan a menu and purchase food for a weekend camp.
    • Scouts can acquire the necessary menu items planned for a team’s weekend camp.
  9. I can demonstrate to others how to use a variety of cooking stoves at camp and explain to others when each type is most effective.
    • Scouts can explain the different types of cooking stoves available for camp use (single and double burner, propane and naphtha.)
    • Scouts can explain when each stove type and fuel type is appropriate for the type and season of camp planned.
  10. I can teach another youth to prepare a meal to be cooked on a fire or improvised stove.
    • Scouts can show other Scouts how to cook meals in a fire using tinfoil or on a created stove (such as a hobo stove design).
  11. I can demonstrate treatment of heat-, cold- and sun-related injuries at camp.
    • Scouts can describe the causes of hypothermia, hyperthermia, sunburn, frostbite etc.
    • Scouts can identify the signs and symptoms of exposure to the elements.
    • Scouts can treat weather-related injuries and medical conditions.
  12. I demonstrate responsibility for myself at camp.
    • Scouts can recognize and take steps to manage themselves in all environmental elements they are exposed to.
  13. I can recognize weather signs and prepare for their impact on camp activities.
    • Scouts can explain the effects that different types of weather have on the local surroundings.
    • Scouts can recognize the various types of clouds and explain the weather conditions they represent.
    • Scouts can recognize and explain how changing temperatures, wind direction and humidity affect the weather.
  14. I can travel while following seven principles of Leave No Trace.
    • Scouts can demonstrate a consistent behaviour with all Leave No Trace practices.
  15. I can describe how to choose the best tent for a specific camp.
    • Scouts can select a tent based on weather, season and location of the camp.
  16. I can teach how to pitch a tent at camp.
    • Scouts can assist younger Scouts with pitching tents.
  17. I can help organize campsite setup and takedown.
    • Scouts can assist in leading setting up and taking down camp (i.e. kitchen, tents, picking site, shelter).
  18. I can help research proposed camping areas and locate services.
    • Scouts can book a camp with all appropriate paperwork (including an emergency plan with directions to the nearest hospital).
  19. I have spent 24 nights at camp in three different season, including a week-long camp, while completing this stage.
    • Scouts have spent at least six of the 24 nights at camp while completing this stage.
    • Scouts must have camped at least three nights out in every season.
  20. I have spent two consecutive nights lightweight camping while completing this stage.
    • Scouts have camped in a remote setting where all the equipment must be transported in a pack or by a self-propelled watercraft.

Stage 7 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can plan and lead a two-night backcountry camp.
    • Scouts have been responsible for the planning and implementing all aspects (transportation, site location, route, menu, equipment) of a two-night backcountry camp.
  2. I can plan activities for at least two different types of camps.
    • Scouts have shown the ability and knowledge required by planning the activities for both a standing camp and a lightweight camp.
  3. I can organize required transportation for camp.
    • Scouts can demonstrate a capability to seek information from and by a number of sources.
    • Scouts can organize a suitable transport to and from the campsite.
  4. I can help plan and lead a backcountry camp of a minimum of two consecutive nights.
    • Scouts can actively assist the person responsible for planning an expedition.
  5. I can audit group emergency equipment for camp.
    • Scouts can present a listing of all group emergency equipment, specifically identifying any broken or missing items.
  6. I can teach another youth how to care for, store and maintain group gear needed for camps.
    • Scouts have mentored other Scouts such that they have successfully completed the group gear/tools requirements for Stages 4, 5, and 6.
  7. I can create personal and group gear lists for lightweight camping excursions.
    • Scouts can present the list to their campmates in preparation for a campout.
  8. I can teach the use of various stoves and their effective use to another youth at camp.
    • Scouts can teach others how to properly use different types of stoves and fuel types.
    • Scouts can teach the proper use and storage of fuel (i.e. propane and naphtha).
  9. I can help prepare and describe an emergency plan for expected risks and hazards at camp.
    • Scouts can explain the risks various activities may have and are able prepare any required safety measures to reduce the risks.
  10. I can take responsibility for myself and my team while at camp.
    • Scouts can recognize and take steps to reduce any perceived issues that may arise in a team environment.
  11. I can demonstrate how to plan for and adapt to changing weather patterns at camp.
    • Scouts can recognize the signs of rainstorms, wind or snowstorms, and know how to protect themselves and their Patrol.
  12. I can teach the seven principles of Leave No Trace as they apply to a camp.
    • Scouts teach the Leave No Trace principles to Scouts who do not know Leave No Trace.
  13. I can teach another youth tent selection by camp type.
    • Scouts can explain to another Scout what types of tents are best for certain seasons and types of weather.
  14. I can organize campsite setup and takedown.
    • Scouts can take a lead role in the setting up and taking down of camp (i.e. kitchen, tents, site selection, shelter).
    • Scouts can appoint others’ direction and duties.
  15. I have spent 30 nights at camp in all four seasons, including two nights without a Scouter while completing this stage.
    • Scouts have camped at least six of the 30 nights camping while completing this stage.
    • Scouts have camped for at least four nights out in each season.

Stage 8 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have mentored someone else who was responsible for planning and leading a camp.
  2. I can source, compare and organize transportation options for local and foreign locations.
  3. I can describe an expedition plan and how the needs of participants have been met in its development.
  4. I can prepare for a specialized expedition.
  5. I can make recommendations to improve group equipment for various camp types.
  6. I can determine if specialized training is required for camp activities.
  7. I can use knowledge of weather patterns to change activities as required at camp.
  8. I have spent 36 nights on various types of camps.

Stage 9 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can source amenities and local places of interest for various camp types.
  2. I can budget, prepare and manage every aspect of a camping expedition.
  3. I have acted as the outing leader on at least two camping expeditions.
  4. I can plan and execute camping expeditions in all types of locations and regions, including internationally.
  5. I am able to source local training required for the specific camp or activity.
  6. I have spent 42 nights on various types of camps.