Aboriginal Awareness Badge

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Contents

Outcomes

Cubs learn about the past and present contributions of Canada's First Peoples, and develop positive attitudes about these contributions. [1]


Requirements

Do any four of the following requirements:

  1. Tell about or show four or more items that were invented by Aboriginal people and which we still use today.
  2. Make a list of Aboriginal words that are used as names of places, such as provinces and territories, cities, towns, parks, roads and waterways. Discover the Aboriginal meaning of these words.
  3. Learn about some of the Aboriginal people who first lived in your area. Using historical information and designs, make a model or display that shows their dwellings, how they traveled, their writing and art forms, and objects used for daily living.
  4. Learn an Aboriginal game, song, dance or story and share it with your six or pack.
  5. Tell how an Aboriginal people's way of life is affected by the part of the country in which they live.
  6. Discover and tell how Aboriginal people helped early explorers and pioneers to settle in Canada.
  7. If possible, arrange to visit with an Aboriginal person. Find out how that person's life is similar to or different from how Aboriginal people lived long ago.

pre 2011 version

Cross-badge links:


Program Suggestions

  • Aboriginal Affairs & Northern Development Canada (www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca)

- Look under Arts, Culture, Heritage / Learning Resources / Kids' Stop / Games for ideas for Cub-age kids.

- "Turtle Island" is a quiz about First Nations, Metis and Inuit items and culture.

- "Memory" is a matching game which teaches about culture and heritage.

  • Inuit Games (www.athropolis.com/news-upload/11-data/index.htm)

- Grade 6 students at Aqsarniit School in Iqaluit show how to do games like the Musk Ox Push, the Kneel Jump and Back Push.

References

  1. Taken from MEASURING SUCCESS - THE SCOUTING WAY