Chief Scout's Award

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ChiefScoutsAward.png

Description: The Queen's crown surmounted by a lion wearing a crown, on a Scout symbol in green, on a red maple leaf; with the wording 'Chief Scout's Award' in white on a curved green banner; all of which sits on a white pentagon.

Originally: The Queen's Crown surmounted by a lion wearing a crown resting above the word 'CANADA' in gold, on a Scout symbol in green; on a circular field of white with a red border.

Original Design until 1979

Introduced: 1973 by The Right Honourable Roland Michener, former Governor-General of Canada

Awarded for: Proficiency in the four areas of skill development: citizenship, leadership, personal development, and outdoor skills.

Awarded by: the Governor-General of Canada, in the official capacity as Chief Scout of Canada, as represented by the Lieutenant-Governor-General of each province or territory.

Background: When the Scout program was divided into Scouts and Venturers, the former Queen's Scout Award was renamed the Queen's Venturer Award. To provide recognition in the Scout section, the Chief Scout's Award was created and is the highest proficiency award which can be achieved at the Scout level in Scouts Canada.

The award consists of a cloth emblem (shown above) and a parchment certificate, signed by the Governor General of Canada, in the official capacity as Chief Scout of Canada. Recipients may also receive a lapel pin representation of the award.

It should be noted that recipients of the award are not styled "Chief Scouts", as there is only one Chief Scout of Canada, but instead are to referred to as "Pathfinder Scout, holder of the Chief Scout's Award".

Contents

Outcomes

In earning this pinnacle award for Scouts, they develop superior knowledge and skills in Citizenship, Leadership, Personal Development and Outdoor Skills areas. [1]


In working towards the Chief Scout's Award, the Scout will have performed well over 30 hours of service in the community, much of it self-directed. They have met with a local service agency and together have discussed and made plans for future improvements in the community. Additional work on the World Conservation Badge exposes a Chief Scout's Award candidate to the many environmental issues of today, and they have taken an active role in promoting those issues with the public. Chief Scout's Award candidates amass more than 100 kilometers in hiking camps and spending time as trainers helping fellow Scouts complete their own badge requirements.

Requirements (Current, under Canadian Path)

EDIT NEEDED

Requirements (2002)

2002, Canadian Scouting Handbook

  1. Successfully complete the Pathfinder Scout Requirements.
  2. Be current in First Aid Standard level, or demonstrate the equivalent attiudes, skills, and knowledge as judged by a "Qualified Instructor of First Aid".
  3. Have earned at least one Challenge Badge in each of the seven (7) Challenge Badge Categories: Athletics, Outdoors, Science & Technology, Home & Family, Personal Development, Culture & Society, Environment.
  4. Hold the World Conservation Award. (Note: the World Conservation Award is being phased out in favour of the World Scout Environment Award.)
  5. Investigate Scouts Canada's involvement in World Scouting. Present your findings in an interesting way to your patrol, troop, or other group. Your presentation should include information on the following:
    1. Scouts Canada's involvement with:
      • the Canadian Scout Brotherhood Fund;
      • world jamborees; and
      • the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM).
    2. The purpose and location of the World Scouting Bureau; and
    3. The current World Scouting membership, and how Canada's membersip compares to that of other countries.
  6. Develop yourself further in each activity area by:
    1. Designing a challenging program with a Scouter which includes the requirement to excel in a component of each activity area (Citizenship, Leadership, Personal Development, and Outdoor Skills). Citizenship must include providing at least 30 hours of leadership to others.
      These hours are in addition to the hours required for the Citizenship Activity Area. If at all possible, provide the service outside of Scouting.
    2. Offering your plans and goals for discussion, and approval to your Court of Honour and Troop Scouter prior to the beginning.
    3. Reporting to, and being evaluated by, the Court of Honour and Troop Scouter on your ongoing progress.

Requirements (Former)

1998, Canadian Scouting Handbook

  1. Successfully complete the Pathfinder Scout requirements.
  2. Be currently qualified in First Aid Standard Level.
  3. Have earned at least one Challenge Badge in each of the seven (7) Challenge Badge Categories: Athletics, Outdoors, Science & Technology, Home & Family, Personal Development, Culture & Society, Environment.
  4. Hold the World Conservation Badge.
  5. Investigate Scouts Canada's involvement in World Scouting. Present your findings in an interesting way to your patrol, troop, or other group. Your presentation should include information on the following:
    1. Scouts Canada's involvement with:
      • the Canadian Scout Brotherhood Fund;
      • world jamborees; and
      • the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM).
    2. The purpose and location of the World Scouting Bureau; and
    3. The current World Scouting membership, and how Canada's membership compares to that of other countries.
  6. Develop yourself further in each activity area by:
    1. Designing a challenging program with a Scouter which includes the requirement to excel in a component of each activity area (Citizenship, Leadership, Personal Development, and Outdoor Skills). Citizenship must include providing at least 30 hours of leadership to others. These hours are in addition to the hours required for the Citizenship Activity Area. If at all possible, provide the service outside of Scouting.
    2. Offering your plans and goals for discussion, and approval to your Court of Honour and Troop Scouter prior to the beginning.
    3. Reporting to, and being evaluated by, the Court of Honour and Troop Scouter on your ongoing progress.

1992, Canadian Scout Handbook

  1. Earn the Pathfinder Award
  2. Earn the World Conservation Badge
  3. Investigate Scouts Canada's involvement in World Scouting. Present your findings in an interesting way to your patrol, troop, or an adult group. Your presentation should include information on the following:
    1. Scouts Canada's involvement with:
      • the work of the Canadian Scout Brotherhood Fund
      • World Jamborees
      • The World Organization of Scout Movements (WOSM).
    2. The purpose and location of the World Scouting Bureau
    3. The current World Scouting membership and how Canada's membership compares to that of other countries.
  4. Be active in your troop for one year. This requirement is evaluated by your fellow Scouts and your Troop Scouter.
  5. Meet with an adult from another agency or community group and discuss what improvements could be made in the community. Determine how you might become involved in bringing about some of those improvements.
  6. Satisfactorily provide leadership to others while carrying out one or more service projects totalling 30 hours of voluntary service to your community. These hours are in addition to the hours required for the Citizen Achievement Badge. If at all possible, provide this service outside of Scouting. Where appropriate, the hours could relate to the community improvement ideas in requirement #5.

Adult Recognition Award

Leaders that have earned this award as a youth are entitled to wear the Adult Recognition Award on their uniform.

Notable Recipients

None yet listed.

References

  1. Taken from MEASURING SUCCESS - THE SCOUTING WAY