Climate Change Challenge Badge

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Climate Change Challenge - Scout Handbook Pages

Requirements

  1. Do three of the four following badges; Home Repair Challenge Badge; Recycling Challenge Badge; World Conservation Award World Scout Environment Award; or Individual/Troop Specialty Challenge Badge.
  2. Make your home more energy wise: Reduce waste of precious energy resources, save your parents’ money, and reduce your contribution to climate change. Investigate and reduce energy consumption in your home by following the Home Energy Audit and Online Energy Calculator posted on the Scouts Canada website.
  3. Take the transportation challenge: Develop a personal transportation challenge. Actively pursue a sport that can serve as a mode of transportation (e.g. biking, in-line skating, skateboarding, etc.). Show that you understand the rules, safety and precautions connected with using the sport as a mode of transportation, as well as the advantages of it, including those of health, air quality and climate change. Make and pursue a plan to travel to one destination (of approximately 5 km) by this alternative mode of transportation once a week for a two month period.
  4. Select and complete three of the challenges from the list below:
    • i) Find out all of the items that your municipality will accept for recycling. Examine what you recycle at home or at the home of your grandparents or another relative and expand your efforts to include all of these items. Don’t forget about items that can be donated (e.g. clothing, dishes, etc.), repaired (e.g. resoling shoes) and refused (e.g. flyers, excess packaging, etc.). Find a way to help your family, relative or grandparent to recycle, reduce, reuse and refuse all these possible items.
    • ii) Report back to your patrol/troop leader on what you accomplished. This challenge also can help you to earn the Recycling Challenge Badge.
    • iii) With permission and help from your parents, do at least two home repairs that will help to reduce the heat or air conditioning escaping from your home. Hint: doing the Home Energy Audit will give you some ideas on what kinds of repairs you can do to complete this challenge. This challenge also can help you to earn the Home Repair badge.
    • iv) With your troop, do a program to educate people in your community about climate change. Develop your own program idea, or select one of these:
      • Adopt a location in the community where cars are often seen idling (at a community mall, at school, outside individual stores, etc.). Idling wastes gas and puts pollutants and green house gases into the atmosphere. Launch a no-idling campaign to decrease or eliminate idling in this location. Take advantage of resources offered through Natural Resources Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency to assist you to develop and deliver the program (http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/personal/idling.cfm).
      • Organize a tire pressure clinic to help cars to run optimally. Visit http://www.betiresmart.ca/ to find out more about this program and how you can organize a tire clinic in your community.
      • Hold a community car wash to discourage people from using automated car washes. This will reduce the use of energy to run the automated car wash.
      • Create and distribute flyers to help your community benefit from what you have learned about climate change. You can encourage them to recycle more items, to find and fix energy leaks in their own home, or to buy locally grown foods. Your project also can help you to earn the Troop Specialty Challenge Badge.
    • v) Complete a project that includes some recognizable work in your community or troop. For example, learn about the range of weather conditions that climate change may bring to your region and make a presentation giving advice on what precautions you would take for a camping-canoeing trip planned during in any one season (spring, summer or winter) or what precautions your community or city should take to prepare for the future. Make a presentation, display or report describing your project, and the global importance of the issue. You may complete the project as an individual or in a group. This challenge also can help you earn the World Conservation Award World Scout Environment Award.
    • vi) Show that you know how to make decisions that reduce the energy you use in running your family home including turning off unnecessary lights and appliances, reducing use of the clothes dryer by hanging laundry to dry, identifying and selecting local products to plan a meal, buying products with less packaging, etc. Track what you did and how often over a period of a month.
    • vii) Participate in a Scoutrees project as an individual or with your troop and demonstrate your understanding of the link between trees and climate change. You could serve as a leader for a Beaver Scout or Cub Scout Scoutrees project and teaching them how Scoutrees work to reduce greenhouse gases.

Requirements(Original Version)

  1. Investigate and reduce energy consumption in your home by following the Home Energy Audit and Online Energy Calculator posted on the Scouts Canada website.
  2. Actively pursue a sport that can serve as a mode of transportation (e.g. biking, in-line skating, skateboarding, etc.). Show that you understand the rules, safety and precautions connected with using the sport as a mode of transportation, as well as the advantages of it, including those of health, air quality and climate change.
  3. Make and pursue a plan to travel to one destination (of approximately 5km) by alternative mode of transportation, other than an automobile, once a week for a two month period.
  4. Complete three of the challenges listed below:
    • i) With permission and help from your parents, do at least two home repairs that will help to reduce the heat or air conditioning escaping from your home.
    • ii) Adopt a location in the community where cars are often seen idling (at a community mall, at school, outside individual stores, etc.). Launch a no-idling campaign to decrease or eliminate idling in this location. (Welcome to the Idle-Free Zone For Individuals).
    • iii) Organize a tire pressure clinic to help cars to run optimally. Visit Be Tire Smart to find out more about this program.
    • iv) Hold a community car wash. This will reduce the use of energy to run the automated car wash.
    • v) Participate in a Scoutrees project as an individual or with a troop and demonstrate your understanding of the link between trees and climate change (ie. serve as a leader for a Beaver Scout or Cub Scout Scoutrees project and teach them how Scoutrees works to reduce greenhouse gases).
Pre-2011 version

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Under the program revitalization effort of the Canadian Path, this article may no longer be applicable.

For information on items replacing this topic, see Personal Achievement Badges - Scouts.


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