Emergency Aid

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Emergency Aid Skills

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Online Resource: Online Resource - Outdoor Adventure Skills - Emergency Aid Skills - Competencies

See the rest of the Outdoor Adventure Skills.

The Outdoor Adventure Skills program is an invitation for Scouts to try something new—to be outside more, testing themselves with progressive challenges while always staying within their capabilities to stay safe. In short, it’s about having life-changing experiences.

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Each Outdoor Adventure Skills pathway is divided into nine stages with a badge awarded for each stage.

Scouts from Beaver Scouts to Rover Scouts are encouraged to work on the stage that is appropriate for their abilities and experience.

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Contents

Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 1 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have made my own personal first aid kit.
    • Scout’s kit should contain:
      • a list of emergency numbers
      • gloves of my size
      • an emergency blanket
      • 5–10 adhesive bandages (e.g. Band-Aids™)
      • pencil and paper
  2. I can demonstrate the basic approach to first aid.
    • In a practice drill, Scouts can demonstrate:
      • checking the scene for dangers (and staying away from them)
      • checking the person who is ill or injured only if it safe to do so
      • calling an adult for help or calling 9-1-1 on the telephone
      • staying with the sick or injured person until help arrives
  3. I can treat minor cuts or scrapes.
    • Scouts can demonstrate:
      • gently cleaning the wound with soap and water
      • putting pressure on the wound if it is still bleeding
      • applying an adhesive bandage that covers the wound
  4. I can be responsible for my own health.
    • Scouts can explain:
      • drinking water during activities or when it is warm outside
      • wearing proper clothing for weather conditions
      • using sunscreen when playing out in the sun
  5. I can be responsible for my own safety.
    • Scouts know not to talk to or go anywhere with strangers.
    • Also see Blue Star A3
  6. I know my address and location in an emergency.
    • Scouts can recite their own address and home phone number.
  7. I know not to play with matches and lighters.
    • Scouts can explain why it is not safe to play with matches and lighters.
  8. I know how to spot things in my home that are not safe.
    • Scouts can list a few items in the home that may be dangerous (for example, hot or sharp) to touch, such as stoves, barbecues, fireplaces, knives, tools, etc.
  9. I know the different emergency services that are available and how and when to call them and what to say.
    • Scouts can recite the ‘911’ telephone number (if applicable in their community) and state the type of emergencies required for calling the number: police, fire, ambulance.
    • Scouts can make a simulated call to describe the help needed to a 911 operator.
  10. I use the “buddy system” when outdoors.
    • Scouts know to buddy-up with a friend during outdoor activities.
  11. I can signal for help if needed when outdoors.
    • Scouts know how to make themselves seen and heard for searchers.
  12. I always tell an adult where I am going.
    • Scouts can explain why they need to tell an adult in charge where they are going if leaving the adults with small groups or a buddy during an outdoor activity.
  13. I carry a whistle and visible signal covering when I go out in the bush.
    • Scouts carry a whistle and visible signal covering (e.g. bright orange garbage bag) with them when in an outdoor setting where they could become lost.
  14. I know to “hug a tree” if lost, or stay in one place if there are no trees.
    • Scouts can demonstrate in a practice drill the technique of staying close to a tree and staying in one spot when lost.
    • Scouts can describe how they know that they are lost.
    • Scouts know to yell and whistle for help.
    • Scouts know to stay warm and dry if they can.
    • Scouts know to spread out visible items for searchers to see from the air.
    • Scouts know to eat food and drink water if they have these items.
  15. I know how to be safe around a campfire.
    • Scouts can state that are to stay a safe distance away from fire.
    • Scouts can state that they will not run and play in the area of the fire.
    • Scouts can state that they will not touch the fire without the help of a Scouter.
    • Scouts can state that they will not touch tools, such as an axe or saw, without proper training and supervision.
    • Scouts can state that they will not throw anything into the fire.
  16. I know how to behave around wildlife.
    • Scouts show a respect for wildlife and do not do anything to harm animals or their habitat.

Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 2 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have added items to my own personal first aid kit and I know how and when to use it.
    • Scouts have added the following items to their first aid kits (made in Stage 1) and should be able to describe basic use of the materials in first aid situations:
      • 5–10 gauze pads
      • 1 roll of medical tape
      • triangular bandages
      • roller gauze
  2. I can keep myself safe in emergency situations.
    • Scouts can describe what could be done by in some of the following emergency situations: house fire, earthquake, tornado, flooding, power outage, etc.
  3. I can care for someone who has a minor burn.
    • Scouts can describe and demonstrate minor burn care: cooling the burn with clean, cool water for at least 10 minutes, or until the burn is cool.
    • See also First Aider Badge #2 d
  4. I have made a home escape plan with my family.
    • Scouts, with help of their families, have made a home escape plan that could include the following:
      • fall & crawl in fire and smoke
      • two exits from every room
      • get out and stay out
      • a safe family meeting spot outside the home
      • what to do if a stranger is at the door
  5. I know where the list of emergency telephone numbers is located in my home and how to call them.
    • Scouts can verify where the emergency numbers are posted in a convenient location in their homes.
    • See also Family Safety Badge #9
  6. I know how to Stop, Drop and Roll if my clothes are on fire.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to stop, drop and roll.
  7. I can recognize a warning label on a product and know to leave the product alone.
    • Scouts can identify the four hazard symbol pictures (explosive, corrosive, flammable, poison) on a number of household products.
    • See also Family Safety Badge #4
  8. I can check for dangers at an emergency situation.
    • Scouts can describe how they should look for potential hazards.
  9. I always follow directions from a Scouter.
    • Scouts demonstrate the ability to follow Scouters’ directions to keep safe, and can explain why it is important to follow directions from an adult.
  10. I can direct a responder to a location where help is needed.
    • Scouts can lead or direct responders to the specific location where help is needed.
    • A practice drill can be used to show this skill.
  11. I know the hazards of water sources in my local area.
    • Scouts can explain the dangers of getting too close to creeks, streams, rivers, lakes and other bodies of water in all seasons.
    • Scouts know to have a responsible adult present when swimming and to never swim or play in water alone.
  12. I wear my helmet when using my bicycle, skateboard or scooter.
    • Scouts consistently wear a properly fitted helmet when riding bicycle, skateboard or scooter
  13. I can dress myself appropriately for the weather.
    • Scouts consistently demonstrate wearing the appropriate clothing for all weather conditions.
  14. I know some of the wild animals in my area and how to be safe around them.
    • Scouts know what wildlife could be dangerous in the area and how best to react when they come in to contact with these animals.
  15. I can find a safe place in bad weather.
    • Scouts can describe the best place to go in case of a thunder and lightning storm, rain, snow, cold, heat, and/or severe wind.

Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 3 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can do first aid for large wounds.
    • Scouts can demonstrate proper care for large wounds:
      • applying pressure to the wound with a clean dressing (such as gauze)
      • securing the dressing with a bandage such as roller gauze or a triangular bandage
      • demonstrate the use of the Scout neckerchief as a triangular bandage
      • if the bleeding does not stop, applying more dressing and bandages and seeking additional help
  2. I can perform first aid for nosebleeds.
    • Scout can demonstrate proper care for a common nosebleed including:
      • pinching the nose
      • tilting the head forward
      • keeping the nose pinched for at least 10 minutes
      • seeking help if the bleeding does not stop after 10 minutes of pressure
    • See also First Aider Badge #2f
  3. I can perform first aid for someone who is choking.
    • Scouts can demonstrate proper care for a choking victim according to the latest methods taught by a first aid organization.
    • See also First Aider Badge #2a
  4. I know the signs and symptoms of shock and how to treat shock.
    • Scouts can explain the signs and symptoms of shock:
      • pale, cool, sweaty skin
      • fast and shallow breathing
      • light-headedness
      • increased heart rate
      • confusion
    • Scout can demonstrate the proper care for shock:
      • putting the person in a comfortable position
      • keeping their body temperature normal (a blanket for someone who is cold, or a shady place for someone who is warm)
      • getting help and keeping the person calm
  5. I can comfort someone who is ill or injured.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the proper care, including:
      • talking calmly with the person
      • keeping the person comfortable
      • treating for shock
      • reassuring the person that help is on the way
      • staying with the person unless they need to go somewhere to call for more help
  6. I can show how to lock, unlock and secure all windows, doors and other entryways into my home.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to lock, unlock and secure windows, doors and entryways in their homes.
  7. I know the dangers of playing on or near train tracks, trestles, crossings and train yards.
    • Scouts can explain the dangers of playing near train areas.
  8. I know the dangers of touching power lines with a stick or ladder, climbing on electrical power poles, towers and substations, and poking electrical outlets.
  9. I know the dangers of playing around storm sewers, construction sites, garbage dumps or dumpsters, ice-covered water or water areas, dams, vacant buildings, farm machinery, quarries, old wells and/or unfriendly animals.
    • Scouts can explain the dangers of playing near listed dangerous areas.
    • Also see Family Safety Badge #8c
  10. I have made a list of emergency numbers, such as: police, fire, ambulance, poison control, etc., and posted it by a telephone in my home.
    • Scouts can verify the emergency numbers are posted in a convenience location in their homes.
    • Also see Family Safety Badge #9
  11. I know how to help create an escape plan for a building or activity location in case of fire.
    • Scouts (working with friends) can make and practise a fire escape plan for a classroom, meeting hall or similar location.
  12. I know the “Rules of the Road” for safe bicycling.
    • Scouts can explain and demonstrate safe bicycle riding.
  13. I can identify some of the poisonous/hazardous plants in my area, and those I may encounter when travelling in Canada.
    • Scouts can identify in nature or describe some poisonous/hazardous plants local to their area (e.g. poison ivy, poison sumac) and know their hazards (e.g causes rash when touched, vomiting when ingesting berries) and can demonstrate how to avoid their toxic elements.
  14. I know some of the international distress signals and when to use these.
    • Scouts can demonstrate two or three international distress signals for a variety of situations (such as lost on land or on water).
  15. I can treat bee stings and reactions to some local plants, such as stinging nettle.
    • Scouts can describe the treatment for a bee sting and exposure to poisonous plants.


Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 4 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can place someone into the recovery (safe airway) position.
    • Scouts can demonstrate placing someone in the recovery position, including care for an unconscious person.
  2. I can provide care for someone who is poisoned.
    • Scouts can explain:
      • not giving the person anything to eat or drink
      • finding out what the poison was
      • calling the local Poison Control number or 9-1-1
  3. I know the first aid treatment for dirt in an eye.
    • Scouts can explain:
      • not rubbing the eye
      • blinking fast
      • if there is still something in the eye, flushing the eye under running water (with the affected eye towards the ground)
      • getting medical assistance quickly if material remains in the eye
  4. I know what goes into our home first aid kit
    • Scouts can describe the items in the kit to their Patrols.
  5. I can help reduce the risk of fire and burns in the home.
    • Scouts can check that:
      • paint, paper, rags and flammables are away from heat
      • hot water tank is set below 54°C (130°F) to help prevent scalding
      • stove-top pot handles are turned away from the front of the stove
  6. I can show how to test and care for a smoke alarm.
  7. I can manage a home emergency situation.
    • Scouts can explain what to do if:
      • the lights go out
      • a fuse blows or circuit breaker trips
      • a water pipe bursts
      • they smell natural gas
      • a drain backs up
      • a fire or carbon monoxide alarm goes off
  8. I know where my local community emergency shelter is located or how to find out where a community emergency shelter is located if one is needed.
    • Scouts can report the local community emergency shelter information to their Patrols.
  9. I know what is in our Group first aid kit and know how to use the kit.
    • Scouts can take out the Group first aid kit before an outing and review the contents with the outing group.
  10. I can care for my feet while outdoors.
    • Scouts know how to;
      • detect a pre-blister hot spot on a foot
      • treat a blister
      • identify and prevent trench foot
      • select the proper footwear for the activity
      • keep toe nails clipped before hiking
      • hike in dry socks and footwear
  11. I can explain how to prevent and treat heat and cold injuries.
    • Scouts can describe the heat and cold injuries encountered when outdoors and the behaviour, equipment, medical and shelter plans to avoid these.
  12. I know how to treat and report (if appropriate) insect and animal bites.
    • Scouts can explain what types of insect and animal bites could happen when outdoors, what the first aid treatment should be and what the follow-up plan should be (if needed).


Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 5 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have successfully completed an Emergency First Aid and CPR (Level A) course from a recognized provider.
      • Recognized providers include:
      • the Canadian Red Cross Society
      • St. John Ambulance
      • the Lifesaving Society
      • the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
      • Canadian Ski Patrol
  2. I can correctly record everything that has happened at the scene of the accident.
    • Scouts can demonstrate (in a practice drill) a written record of:
      • who was ill/injured
      • when did this happen
      • where did this happen
      • what happened
      • what treatment was done
      • what additional help did you get
  3. I know the rules and why they are important for a home pool, community pool or a body of water used for swimming.
    • Scouts can explain the pool rules.
  4. I can demonstrate how to safely use and care for a barbecue.
    • Scouts will demonstrate, by cooking a barbecue meal for their Patrol mates, how to safely use and care for the appliance.
  5. I have assisted in providing training to others in aspects of emergency aid.
    • Scouts are able to assist with emergency aid training at a Scout meeting or camp.
  6. I know how to deal with an incident, injury or illness in a remote outdoor location and how to summon help.
    • Scouts can explain how to:
      • secure the site and individual(s) from further hazard and harm
      • care for the victim(s) and rest of the group
      • make and activate a plan to raise an alarm for assistance
      • begin an evacuation or establish a treatment site
  7. I know how and when to use flares, mirrors, horns and other long-distance signalling devices.
    • Scouts can explain these devices, and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  8. I know how to build a stretcher from improvised materials.
    • Scouts can build a stretcher from items brought along on a typical outdoor activity day.
  9. I can use a compass and/or a GPS device to find direction and travel to a desired location.
    • Scouts can lead a navigational exercise in the field that includes the following:
      • Scouts can read a map and locate themselves on a map
      • Scouts can navigate to any fixed point on a map and do so with a safe and effective route plan
      • Scouts can establish an evacuation route on a map


Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 6 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have participated in and successfully completed a Standard First Aid with CPR (Level C) course or a Marine Basic First Aid with CPR (Level C), from a recognized provider.
    • Recognized providers include:
      • the Canadian Red Cross Society
      • St. John Ambulance
      • the Lifesaving Society
      • the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
      • Canadian Ski Patrol
  2. I have acted as an Emergency Response/Preparedness resource on at least one Scouting activity.
    • Scouts can participate as a resource on campout, jamboree or any other event where a large group or Patrol is present.
  3. I can explain the different classes of fires, and how to use different types of fire extinguishers.
  4. I have met with a member of a community-based emergency response team and discussed his or her role and responsibilities in my community (e.g. search and rescue, police, fire, ambulance, coast guard, etc.).
    • Scouts can arrange for a community-based emergency response team member to visit a Scout meeting or for a Patrol to travel and meet with the response team member.
  5. I can identify common poisonous plants in my area and I know how to treat exposure and symptoms.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their poisonous plant knowledge to a group of Scouts.
  6. I have acted as a member of a first aid team on at least one outdoor activity.
    • Scouts can be a designated first aid provider on a Scout outing for a minimum of four days. This service does not have to be at one outing.


Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 7 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have successfully completed an outdoor curriculum first aid course.
    • Scouts can attend one of the following:
      • Advanced Wilderness & Remote First Aid course (Canadian Red Cross)
      • Wilderness First Aid Level III course (St. John Ambulance)
      • Wilderness First Responder — from commercial vendor
      • or equivalent certification level from a recognized provider
  2. I respond to emergency situations and follow best practices for first aid, as per whatever first aid certification I hold.
    • Scouts can maintain their first aid skill and certification competence by:
      • attending a renewal course
      • participating in first aid scenarios
      • being a first aider at events
      • reviewing course manuals
  3. I have prepared and maintain a 72–96 hour home emergency kit.
    • Scouts should create this emergency kit with their families.
  4. I have filled out Scouts Canada Outdoor Activity application for at least three Scout group events.
    • Scouts are to ensure they consider participants, including Scouters, are:
      • in the Right Place,
      • at the Right Time,
      • with the Right People
      • and with the Right Equipment
  5. I have acted as a first aider on at least four occasions during single-day group outings or two standard weekend camps.
    • Scouts duties include preparing the first aid kit, treating any injuries and properly following-up on any incidents.
  6. I have acted as an emergency preparedness and management support for at least one weekend standing camp or two Area events.
    • Scouts in this role are to be under the direct supervision of an adult Scouter.
  7. I can use can use a variety of communication devices effectively in an emergency situation. I have participated in a session on correct use of radio communications and protocols (ARES).
    • Scouts know how to use a variety of emergency communication devices, such as:
      • satellite phone,
      • Spot device,
      • InReach device,
      • Personal Locator Beacon,
      • VHF/UHF/CB radio,
      • marine radio,
      • Emergency Position Indicator Radio Beacon (EPIRB).
  8. I have met with a member of a community-based search and rescue emergency response team and discussed his or her role and responsibilities in my community.
    • Scouts have arranged for this response team member to meet with a Scout Group.
  9. I have participated in a wilderness search and rescue operation (training or real).
    • Scouts can spend at the minimum of one days’ time in a SAR operation.
  10. I know what specialized equipment is required in my field first aid kit based upon my activities, skill level, certification and how to use and care for the equipment.
    • Scouts can present their kit to their Patrol for review.


Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 8 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have successfully completed an advanced first aid course.
    • Scouts can choose from the following courses:
      • First Responder with CPR Level HCP (Canadian Red Cross Society),
      • Advanced Medical First Responder with CPR Level HCP (St. John Ambulance),
      • Marine Advanced First Aid (as recognized by Transport Canada),
      • Advanced First Aid (as recognized by the Province of Alberta), or equivalent nationally-recognized certificate, or higher qualification or
      • hold a current certificate from a recognised body in Emergency/Disaster Response such as VERC, TeenCERT, Ontario Volunteer Emergency Response Team
  2. I have successfully completed a non-first aid certification course in an area of my personal interest within Emergency Aid.
    • Scouts can take a course in the following:
      • Aquatic Lifesaving and Lifeguarding
      • Swiftwater Rescue
      • High Angle Rescue
      • Boat Rescue
      • Ice Safety, Glacier/Avalanche Safety
      • Search and Rescue
      • Canadian Ski Patrol Training
      • SCUBA Rescue
      • TeenCERT Train-the-Trainer, or
      • Emergency Management Ontario’s BEM-100 [Basic Emergency Management Certificate] or local provincial equivalent or
      • A training or qualification that can be approved by my Section Leadership Team as meeting this non-first aid certification course requirement.
  3. As part of taking a non-first aid certification course, I can improve my risk management skills.
    • Scouts can assess and manage risk in various and constantly changing situations.
    • Scouts can constantly assess hazardous situations as they arise and take measures to limit risk.
  4. I can safely perform basic emergency repairs on an automobile, such as changing a flat tire or jump-starting a car.
    • Scouts can explain a circle check on a vehicle.
    • Scouts can instruct younger Scouts (16 years and older) on how to jump-start a car and change a tire.
  5. I can start and maintain a consumer emergency generator.
    • Scouts can follow the manufacturer’s instructions for the safe start and maintenance of an emergency generator.
  6. I have taught a group of people on the importance of, and what should be in, a 72-hr home preparedness kit.
    • Scouts can lead a session for younger Scouts or another group on the contents and use of a 72-hr home preparedness kit.
  7. I know and can describe the steps required to triage in a mass casualty incident (MCI).
    • Scouts can practise this skill in an incident scenario.
  8. I have met with a member of underwater community-based emergency response search team and discussed his or her role and responsibilities in my community.
    • Scouts will arrange for this emergency response search team member to meet a Scout Group.
  9. I can create a trip plan with detailed risk management strategies for an activity with my group.
    • Scouts will have the plan and strategies approved by a Scouter or Group Commissioner.
  10. I know what equipment needs to be in a first aid kit for an activity of at least one weekend in length in the wilderness.
    • Scouts will demonstrate the kit to their Patrols.
  11. I have been the responsible first aider for an outdoor expedition of at least three nights.
    • Scouts are to have the appropriate first aid certification for this outing.
  12. I can purify water in a safe manner.
    • Scouts can purify water from a natural source.
  13. I have built an emergency shelter in the wilderness with minimal equipment, and I have slept in it overnight.
    • Scouts can build a shelter with whatever they can carry in a backpack; the shelter is to be precipitation-proof.
  14. I can lead a team at least 100m over wilderness terrain in transporting a patient with an injury (who cannot walk by his or her own power).
    • Scouts can complete this task as part of an outdoor rescue scenario.
  15. I know the limitation in a wilderness setting when calling for medical evacuation transport.
    • Scouts can explain how different locations and terrain require different means of transport.
  16. I know what preparations should be made when calling a medical helicopter.
    • Scouts can explain the landing requirements, landing site safety and victim packaging requirements.
  17. I can describe and demonstrate proper use of fire extinguishers or other tools/methods for extinguishing fires.
    • Scouts can speak about extinguish cooking fires, grassfire, electrical fires, etc.


Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 9 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have successfully completed instructor training in the area of my personal interest within Emergency Aid.
    • Scouts can choose instructor training in any of the flowing:
      • First Aid
      • Aquatic Lifesaving and Lifeguarding
      • Swiftwater Rescue
      • High Angle Rescue,
      • Boat Rescue
      • Ice Safety, Glacier/Avalanche Safety
      • Search and Rescue
      • Canadian Ski Patrol Training
      • SCUBA Rescue
      • TeenCERT Train-the-Trainer
      • Emergency Management Ontario’s BEM-100 [Basic Emergency Management Certificate] or local provincial equivalent or
      • Any training or qualification approved by the Section Leadership Team as meeting the instructor training requirement.
  2. I have used my instructor qualification to teach Scouts or another community group the course’s curriculum, as permitted by my instructor certificate.
    • Scouts can teach an emergency skill based upon the qualifications permitted by instructor’s certificate.
  3. I can provide immediate treatment and deal with complicated emergency situations.
    • Scouts can demonstrate this competency to the Section Leadership Team by either:
      • presenting a case study of a situation the Scout has been in that was complicated and in the Scout’s personal interest in Emergency Aid.
      • or
      • participating in scenarios relevant to the Scout’s personal interest in Emergency Aid that are complicated in nature and include an personal and group evaluation component.
  4. I have completed a minimum of 75 hours of volunteer first aid service in addition to those hours already used to complete an earlier stage.
    • Scouts can perform this service at a Scout or community event approved by the Section Leadership Team.
  5. I have participated in the preparation and implementation of an Emergency Response Plan for an Area Event/Camp lasting 5 days or involving participants numbering 400 or more.
    • Scouts can participate in the planning and implementation of an Emergency Response Plan for a large Scouting event that is five days in length or has over 400 participates for a shorter period.
  6. I have provided Emergency Skills mentorship to a Stage 7/8 Emergency Skills Scout.
    • Scouts can provide instructions and assistance with Scouts working on Stage 7 or 8 of Emergency Skills.
  7. I have met with a member of community-based emergency air search response team and discussed his or her role and responsibilities in my community.
    • Scouts can arrange for a response team member to meet with a Scout group.
  8. I can assemble, display and describe winter and summer survival kits and explain how to use them.
    • Scouts can help younger Scouts assemble their own survival kits.
  9. I can explain to another group (for example, Wood Badge participants) what to do if lost in the wilderness.
    • Scouts can teach a lost in the woods lesson to a younger group.
  10. I have participated in a multi-casualty emergency exercise.
    • Scouts can contact the local Search and Rescue groups to arrange for this participation. Emergency Management exercises are required by Provincial Emergency Management Acts.
  11. I know the health risks, and possible ways to mitigate the risks, when travelling to a part of the world I have not before visited.
    • Scouts can explain what governmental and non-governmental sources can be accessed as part of the health and safety planning for an international trip.