Emergency Aid Skills Stage 3

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Emergency Aid Skills - Stage 3 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can do first aid for large wounds.
    • Scouts can demonstrate proper care for large wounds:
      • applying pressure to the wound with a clean dressing (such as gauze)
      • securing the dressing with a bandage such as roller gauze or a triangular bandage
      • demonstrate the use of the Scout neckerchief as a triangular bandage
      • if the bleeding does not stop, applying more dressing and bandages and seeking additional help
  2. I can perform first aid for nosebleeds.
    • Scout can demonstrate proper care for a common nosebleed including:
      • pinching the nose
      • tilting the head forward
      • keeping the nose pinched for at least 10 minutes
      • seeking help if the bleeding does not stop after 10 minutes of pressure
    • See also First Aider Badge #2f
  3. I can perform first aid for someone who is choking.
    • Scouts can demonstrate proper care for a choking victim according to the latest methods taught by a first aid organization.
    • See also First Aider Badge #2a
  4. I know the signs and symptoms of shock and how to treat shock.
    • Scouts can explain the signs and symptoms of shock:
      • pale, cool, sweaty skin
      • fast and shallow breathing
      • light-headedness
      • increased heart rate
      • confusion
    • Scout can demonstrate the proper care for shock:
      • putting the person in a comfortable position
      • keeping their body temperature normal (a blanket for someone who is cold, or a shady place for someone who is warm)
      • getting help and keeping the person calm
  5. I can comfort someone who is ill or injured.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the proper care, including:
      • talking calmly with the person
      • keeping the person comfortable
      • treating for shock
      • reassuring the person that help is on the way
      • staying with the person unless they need to go somewhere to call for more help
  6. I can show how to lock, unlock and secure all windows, doors and other entryways into my home.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to lock, unlock and secure windows, doors and entryways in their homes.
  7. I know the dangers of playing on or near train tracks, trestles, crossings and train yards.
    • Scouts can explain the dangers of playing near train areas.
  8. I know the dangers of touching power lines with a stick or ladder, climbing on electrical power poles, towers and substations, and poking electrical outlets.
  9. I know the dangers of playing around storm sewers, construction sites, garbage dumps or dumpsters, ice-covered water or water areas, dams, vacant buildings, farm machinery, quarries, old wells and/or unfriendly animals.
    • Scouts can explain the dangers of playing near listed dangerous areas.
    • Also see Family Safety Badge #8c
  10. I have made a list of emergency numbers, such as: police, fire, ambulance, poison control, etc., and posted it by a telephone in my home.
    • Scouts can verify the emergency numbers are posted in a convenience location in their homes.
    • Also see Family Safety Badge #9
  11. I know how to help create an escape plan for a building or activity location in case of fire.
    • Scouts (working with friends) can make and practise a fire escape plan for a classroom, meeting hall or similar location.
  12. I know the “Rules of the Road” for safe bicycling.
    • Scouts can explain and demonstrate safe bicycle riding.
  13. I can identify some of the poisonous/hazardous plants in my area, and those I may encounter when travelling in Canada.
    • Scouts can identify in nature or describe some poisonous/hazardous plants local to their area (e.g. poison ivy, poison sumac) and know their hazards (e.g causes rash when touched, vomiting when ingesting berries) and can demonstrate how to avoid their toxic elements.
  14. I know some of the international distress signals and when to use these.
    • Scouts can demonstrate two or three international distress signals for a variety of situations (such as lost on land or on water).
  15. I can treat bee stings and reactions to some local plants, such as stinging nettle.
    • Scouts can describe the treatment for a bee sting and exposure to poisonous plants.