Trail Skills

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Trail Skills

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Online Resource: Online Resource - Outdoor Adventure Skills - Trail Skills - Competencies

See the rest of the Outdoor Adventure Skills.

The Outdoor Adventure Skills program is an invitation for Scouts to try something new—to be outside more, testing themselves with progressive challenges while always staying within their capabilities to stay safe. In short, it’s about having life-changing experiences.

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Each Outdoor Adventure Skills pathway is divided into nine stages with a badge awarded for each stage.

Scouts from Beaver Scouts to Rover Scouts are encouraged to work on the stage that is appropriate for their abilities and experience.

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Contents

Trail Skills - Stage 1 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can help pack a rucksack for a day hike.
    • Scouts can indicate the items to bring for a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain how to pack soft items, heavy items and food items.
    • Scouts can explain what is meant by “first in-last out” when packing items.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the wet weather equipment to bring on a day hike
  2. I can dress myself for a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain how weather affects what can be worn for a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain the concept of layering and understand what to wear for wet weather.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the types of footwear needed for a day hike in each season.
  3. I can list what food to bring on a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain the food groups to bring for a day hike to sustain and boost energy.
    • Scouts can show what to bring for snacks.
    • Scouts can show how to keep drinks hot or cold.
    • Scouts can explain what dehydration means and can show how to bring water on a day hike.
  4. I can follow directions on a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain why they must listen to the Scouter so that everyone is kept safe on a day hike.
  5. I can identify the main parts of a compass.
    • Scouts can identify the parts of a compass outdoors in a practical experience.
  6. I can behave safely while hiking.
    • Scouts can describe safety rules and procedures that will keep themselves and their group safe while on a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain how their own behaviour affects others on the day hike.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to hike on various types of terrain (smooth, rough), how to keep up with others and the importance of always being able to see a Scouter while on the day hike.
  7. I can be responsible for myself while we are hiking.
    • Scouts can explain how they contribute to the success of the day hike by being members of the team.
    • Scouts can describe how their awareness will help everyone have a safe day hike.
  8. I can explain the buddy system.
    • Scouts explain how and why the buddy system is used on a day hike.
  9. I can recognize the main distress signals.
    • Scouts can draw and identify the main distress signals.
  10. I have attended at least two hikes.
    • As much as possible these can be different types of day hikes, such as in neighborhoods, parks, open natural areas, etc.

Trail Skills - Stage 2 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I know what gear to bring for a hike depending on the weather.
    • Scouts can explain how weather varies from one location to another (from flat urban areas to wooded areas, valleys to hilltops) and how that will affect what gear to bring on a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain the gear needed for downpour, high winds, sun and humidity.
    • Scouts can explain the importance of bringing personal protection materials needed for insects and sun.
  2. I can show how to take care of all personal gear needed for a day hike.
    • Scouts can explain the value of gear needed for hikes and the importance of caring for it. Scouts can check their equipment prior to the hike.
    • Scouts show how to put away and store equipment after the hike.
  3. I can read a simple map.
    • Scouts can read a simply drawn map of the neighbourhood (e.g. meeting area, local park etc.). Scouts can demonstrate how to orient a map and how to follow a simple route around the map.
    • Scouts can explain how different colours on a map define the areas (water, urban, park, forest) and can identify symbols used for roads, trails, buildings, rivers, etc.
  4. I can use a compass to find basic directions.
    • Scouts can demonstrate basic use of the compass: how to take a bearing and how to follow a bearing.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to use a map and compass together to navigate an area.
  5. I can obtain a weather forecast.
    • Scouts can list methods to obtain a weather forecast.
    • Scouts can explain why Scouts need to watch forecasts ahead of a hike.
  6. I can be a responsible member of my team while we are hiking.
    • Scouts can identify some risk concerns that might be present on a day hike and offer safety procedures to counteract them.
    • Scouts can explain how to be a member of the team while on a hike and how their behaviour will impact the hike and experience of others.
  7. I can get help if someone is hurt.
    • Scouts can recognize when someone is injured and needs help.
    • Scouts can explain how to get help in various conditions.
  8. I have attended at least three hikes.
    • Scouts have attended at least three hikes in natural areas such as parks, forests and Scout camps.
  9. I can explain why one bring
    • Scouts can explain the need for sustaining and energy foods.
    • Scouts can help plan the food items for a day hike.
    • Some food considerations include: Canada’s Food guide, high energy; water; carbohydrates, weight considerations, cooking equipment.

Trail Skills - Stage 3 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can pack a rucksack for a day hike.
    • Scouts can list the equipment, including team equipment to bring with them for a day hike.
    • Scouts can show how to pack equipment in their rucksack: heavy items, soft items, last in-first out principle, food items and water.
  2. I can explain what clothes to bring for a day hike depending on the weather.
    • Scouts can explain how the weather can change very quickly and how they need to plan in advance.
    • Scouts can explain the layering system, outer shell; how to control body head and ventilation; wicking principle.
  3. I can follow a route on an orienteering map.
    • Scouts can follow a simple orienteering trail using an orienteering map.
  4. I can identify the features of a topographical map.
    • Scouts can point out key features of a map and describe the landscape based on contours, vegetation and water features.
    • Scouts can explain scale and grid references found on maps.
  5. I can demonstrate the basic use of a GPS unit.
    • Scouts can turn on a GPS and use it to orient their location.
  6. I can teach another youth how to find directions by using a compass.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the use of a compass to another youth including: taking a bearing, following a bearing and orienting a map with a compass.
  7. I can explain the effect of weather on hiking activities.
    • Scouts can describe how weather will affect their hike—duration, pace.
    • Scouts can explain what to do if encountering severe weather alone or in a group.
  8. I can be responsible for myself and aware of my surroundings while hiking.
    • Scouts can explain how terrain and trails affect their hike.
    • Scouts can reduce risks when crossing steep or rugged areas as well as in remote areas.
  9. I can explain the main principles of Leave No Trace.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the Leave No Trace principles in action when on a hike, including: waste reduction, respect for animals, minimizing impact on the trail, consideration for others.
    • Scouts can explain how urination and defecation are handled on the trail.
  10. I can treat simple cuts and scratches.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to clean the wound, apply a bandage and reassure the patient.
  11. I know how to avoid becoming lost, and I know what to do if I get lost.
    • Scouts can explain how to prevent becoming lost and what to do if they are lost alone or as a group.
  12. I have attended at least thee hiking activities, one of which involves hiking on hilly trails.
    • Scouts have attended at least three activities in various terrains, and trail types.
    • These can be different from those experienced at Stage 1 or 2.

Trail Skills - Stage 4 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can teach another youth what to pack for a day hike.
    • Scouts can show other Scouts how to pack the equipment in their rucksack: heavy items, soft items, last in-first out principle, food items and water.
  2. I can pack a rucksack for a weekend hike.
    • Scouts can explain the equipment (including group equipment) needed for an overnight hike. Scouts can show how to pack heavy items, soft items, food, fuel, stoves, and their share of team equipment.
    • Scouts can explain the types of eye protection needed for various conditions, such as: sunglasses, glacier glasses and snow goggles.
    • Scouts can list and describe the 10 essential items to always have in their pack.
  3. I can show how to care for all my personal hiking equipment needed for a weekend hike.
    • Scouts can explain the value of maintaining equipment and demonstrate how to check and care for their equipment including: safety considerations, keeping equipment in working condition, checking in advance, simple repairs and cleaning
  4. I know how to plan for and avoid food allergies in a group hike.
    • Scouts can describe how to keep food safe for all members of the group and avoid cross-contamination.
    • Scouts can explain how to recognize and treat allergies, including anaphylactic reactions.
  5. I can use a map and compass together for navigation.
    • Scouts can plot a hiking route on a map, taking into consideration the terrain and features. Scouts can follow the progress of the hike and mark points as they are achieved.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the use of a compass to determine bearings for the route.
    • Scouts can plot locations based on a grid references, calculate distances and changes in height.
  6. I can teach another youth how to follow a route on an orienteering map.
    • Scouts demonstrate to others how to follow a pre-defined route on a map
  7. I can keep a map dry and safe from the elements.
    • Scouts can describe and use the various methods of keeping a map dry and safe: zip-lock bags, laminating, map cases and map coatings.
  8. I can locate a waypoint that has been pre-programmed into a GPS unit.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to locate a pre-programmed waypoint.
  9. I can plan and bring appropriate personal gear to use on a hike based on weather forecasts for the hiking area.
    • Scouts can demonstrate methods of obtaining the forecast for the hiking area.
    • Scouts can show how to prepare for the various weather conditions that may be encountered on the hike.
  10. I can cross various terrains, such as wet or rocky ground.
    • Scouts can explain how to cross various terrains safely.
    • Scouts can cross wet bogs or marshes safely and minimize their impact on the environment.
  11. I can apply the Leave No Trace principles while hiking.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their knowledge of the Leave No Trace principles by disposing of waste properly, respecting wildlife, minimizing the impacts of hiking and fire, showing consideration of others and hiking and camping on durable surfaces whenever possible.
  12. I can minimize trail hazards for myself and others as encountered (trip hazards on the trail, minimizing branch whip while moving them out of the way, etc.—overall trail etiquette).
    • Scouts can demonstrate hiking etiquette on the trail.
    • Scouts know what to do if encountering other hikers on a trail.
    • Scouts can avoid livestock or wildlife on a trail, and know what to do if animals are encountered.
  13. I can be responsible for younger or less experienced members of my team while we are hiking.
    • Scouts have a level of awareness to help younger or less experienced Scouts while hiking.
  14. I can treat simple sprains and blisters.
    • Scouts can demonstrate treatment of simple foot or ankle sprains and blisters.
    • Scouts can explain the difficulties providing treatment of simple sprains and blisters when on the trail and why to avoid these injuries.
    • Scouts can make the patient feel safe and know how to get help.
    • Scouts know the materials in a first aid kit that are used to treat a blister and demonstrate their skill.
  15. I can identify the different emergency services that are available and how and when to call them.
    • Scouts can explain how to call for emergency services in the area in which Scouts are hiking (police, ambulance, search etc.).
    • Scouts are able to explain what each service would provide in a hiking situation.
  16. I can build or find an emergency shelter.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to erect a simple emergency shelter or explain natural formations that could be used for emergency shelters
  17. I have attended three hikes (including an overnight).
    • Scouts have attended at least three hikes in wilderness-type areas different from those experienced in other stages. One of the hikes is to be an overnight experience.
  18. I can lead a leg of a hike.
    • Scouts can take the lead position on a section of a hike.
    • Scouts will demonstrate how to navigate, support, guide and lead others over the trail.
  19. I can help plan a day hike.
    • Scouts have been involved in the selection of season and location for a day hike.

Trail Skills - Stage 5 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can explain how the weather affects the equipment I bring on a weekend hike.
    • Scouts can explain how the weather can change very quickly and how they need to plan in advance.
    • Scouts can explain the layering system, outer shell; how to control body head and ventilation; wicking principle.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to keep their pack and pack contents dry in wet and snow conditions.
  2. I can show what group equipment to bring on a weekend hike and explain why each item is needed.
    • Scouts can list the basic equipment needed and why and how it is to be used on a weekend hike.
    • This includes camping, safety and personal equipment.
  3. I can show how to use group equipment correctly.
    • Scouts can demonstrate proper use of equipment while supervised on a hike.
  4. I can select appropriate footwear for various hikes.
    • Scouts can describe appropriate footwear and comfort factors such as ankle support, sole support and construction materials.
    • Scouts can explain the use of gaiters when hiking.
  5. I can demonstrate how to use different types of lightweight stoves to prepare a meal.
    • Scouts can describe the different types of stoves and fuel that can be used on day and overnight hikes.
  6. I can keep food and food preparation materials hygienic.
    • Scouts can describe how to keep food, food containers and food utensils hygienic and how to handle food safely during the hike and while preparing meals.
  7. I can use a map and compass to find my position on the ground.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their skills with a map and compass while supervised on the trail. Scouts can show how to find their position on the map with reference to their surroundings and local features.
    • Scouts can take bearings of surrounding areas and find their position.
  8. I can plot a proposed hiking route on a map and obtain the required compass bearings.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to plot a hike route and use a compass to obtain the necessary bearings.
    • Scouts can orient the map using features on a map and use the features to plot a hiking route.
  9. I can input a given waypoint into a GPS and then find it.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to use a GPS by entering waypoints and navigating to the destination.
  10. I can teach another youth the basic use of a GPS unit.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to use a GPS to other Scouts.
  11. I can find directions without a compass.
    • Scouts can demonstrate various methods of finding direction: using the sun, stars, shadows, a watch, the moon.
  12. I can describe the dangers of weather on hikes.
    • Scouts can explain how temperature changes and changes in wind speed and direction can indicate weather changes.
    • Scouts can describe how cloud cover, mist, fog and snow can affect the hike and how to be proactively safe.
  13. I can plan effectively and recommend appropriate gear for my group to take based on weather forecasts for the hike area.
    • Scouts can list the gear needed for the hike and the adjustments required depending on weather forecasts.
    • Scouts can distinguish between regular group gear and safety/emergency use gear.
  14. I know when and how to cross a river.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to cross a river using various methods, including the preferred safe crossing on a bridge or other designated safe crossing areas.
    • Scouts can explain safety procedures including how to protect clothes so youth stay dry, and steps to keep warm.
  15. I can show how and explain when to use the main distress signals.
    • Scouts can demonstrate distress signals while supervised outdoors in both daytime and night-time conditions.
  16. I can hike on steep trails safely, using appropriate gear as required.
    • Scouts can demonstrate awareness of trail conditions and ways to support other members of the team.
    • Scouts can explain the various roles required for a safe hiking experience.
    • Scouts can describe proper trail pacing for a group and how to schedule rest and water breaks.
    • Scouts can explain the role of the front leader and rear follower on a hike.
  17. I can be an active member of my team while hiking.
    • Scouts demonstrate their knowledge of flora and fauna that could be hazardous on the trail. Scouts can explain how to recognize these hazards, how to avoid the hazards and how to respond to exposure.
  18. I can recognize and respond to hazards from flora and fauna.
    • Scouts have attended at least three hikes in wilderness-type areas in addition to and different from those experienced in other stages.
    • One of the hikes is to be a two-night hike experience.
  19. I have taken part in three hikes (including an overnight).
    • Scouts can keep the date, route and other details of the adventure in a log which can be added to with each hiking adventure.
  20. I have written a log for at least two of these activities.
    • Scouts can be involved in all aspects of planning an overnight hike.
  21. I can help plan an overnight hike.
    • Scouts can select a location that meets the desired hiking trip requirements.
  22. I can help choose a suitable hiking destination.
    • Scouts can describe and demonstrate safe practices for steep trails and list the required safety gear (such as hiking poles).

Trail Skills - Stage 6 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can teach another youth what to pack for a weekend hike.
    • Scouts can teach others how and what to pack for a weekend hike.
    • Scouts can explain to others the different types of materials used for clothing such as cotton, wool and synthetics, and can describe their properties for hiking (e.g. breathable, waterproof, weight, etc.).
  2. I can show what group emergency equipment we can carry on a weekend hike, and how to use each item.
    • Scouts can list the items that are needed for safety and emergency use for a weekend hike, including safety ropes, sleeping materials, dry bags, shelters and first aid kits.
  3. I can teach another youth how to care for, store and maintain the group equipment.
    • Scouts demonstrate to other youth how to look after group equipment.
  4. I can look after my hiking footwear.
    • Scouts demonstrate proper cleaning and storage of their footwear, including waterproofing
  5. I can select and maintain my pack for various hiking adventures.
    • Scouts explain how to choose a pack, fit it, name the key parts, and know how to make repairs while on the trail.
  6. I know how much water to drink and the effects and treatment of dehydration.
    • Scouts explain dehydration: its signs and symptoms and treatment.
    • Scouts can explain how much water intake is needed at rest and on the hike.
  7. I know how to use different methods to treat water.
    • Scouts demonstrate how to use water purifiers and identify suitable natural sources from which to obtain water.
  8. I can avoid hyponatremia by ensuring proper planning for the hike.
    • Scouts can explain the signs and symptoms of hyponatremia and how to avoid it on hiking experiences.
  9. I can obtain coordinates from a point of interest on a topographical map so that it can be inputted into a GPS unit.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to find their position on a map and use their map skills to enter coordinates into a GPS unit so that others can navigate from that point to another on the hike.
  10. I can demonstrate the limitations of the compass and other navigation tools.
    • Scouts can describe how a compass and other navigation tools each have limitations and know where and under what conditions these will not operate correctly
  11. I can teach another youth how to find his or her position on the ground using a map and compass.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their expertise by teaching others how to use a map and compass to find their position on the hike.
  12. I can recognize changing weather patterns while hiking.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their knowledge of weather by recognizing temperature changes, changes in wind speed, and cloud formations.
  13. I can show different methods for crossing waterways.
    • Scouts can demonstrate various ways of crossing waterways while on a hike.
  14. I can teach the principles of Leave No Trace.
    • Scouts can teach the principles of Leave No Trace in a hiking context to others.
  15. I can recognize unstable or elevated risk areas (e.g. slick trails, icy terrain) and either avoid them or minimize the risk in crossing the area with accepted use of gear and technique.
    • Scouts can demonstrate safe techniques while hiking on various types of terrain.
  16. I can recognize and treat hypothermia, hyperthermia, sunstroke, dehydration and asthma, or other medical conditions relevant to my team.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their knowledge of first aid by listing the symptoms and treatment for various situations.
    • Scouts understand the need to update medical information prior to a hike.
  17. I can be responsible for myself and my team while hiking.
    • Scouts display confidence and preparedness on hikes.
    • Scouts can use Naismith’s rule and its modifications while hiking to set pace and rest positions.
    • Scouts can explain the role of a good trail leader and trail follower
  18. I can describe the limitations of my team.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their team skills by being aware of others’ energy levels or trail conditions which may be beyond others’ skill levels.
    • Scouts can demonstrate trail etiquette and rules to ensure a safe hiking adventure.
  19. I have taken part in at least six hiking activities, and at least one is a two-night hike.
    • Scouts have attended at least six hiking adventures beyond those of previous stages.
    • The hikes can be in various types of terrain.
  20. I have written logs for all of these activities.
    • Scouts can keep the date, route and other details of the adventure in a log which can be added to with each hiking adventure.
  21. I can plan and lead a day hike.
    • Scouts can take the leadership role in planning a hike with supervision.
    • Activities include choice of area, trail, route preparation, navigation, weather, budget, etc.
    • Scouts can explain and demonstrate good trail leadership and followership.
  22. I can help organize the transportation required for an activity.
    • Scouts help to plan rides, ferries and busses to location of a hike.

Trail Skills - Stage 7 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can pack a rucksack for a hiking expedition of more than two nights.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to pack their personal and group gear for a hiking expedition of more than two nights.
  2. I can inspect group emergency equipment for a hiking expedition of more than two nights.
    • Scouts will recognize equipment that needs maintenance repair or replacement.
  3. I can show what group equipment to bring on a hiking expedition of more than two nights and explain why each item is needed.
    • Scouts will demonstrate their expertise by describing the equipment.
  4. I can choose appropriate lightweight hiking equipment.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their expertise by explaining what lightweight equipment is and how it is used, and help to evaluate various makes and brands of equipment prior to its purchase.
  5. I can plan and cook a variety of meals on a hiking expedition of more than two nights.
    • Scouts can demonstrate cooking while on the hiking expedition.
    • Meals can fulfil nutritious needs and sustain energy for hiking.
    • Scouts can also explain how to pack and carry emergency rations for a hike.
  6. I can explain how much food is needed on hiking expeditions of various lengths.
    • Scouts can explain how trail snacks can be used on a hike to supply energy.
    • Scouts can describe how much energy is used on a hike (calories) and how much food is needed to support a hiking expedition.
  7. I can navigate at night or in poor visibility.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their skill in hiking in poor visibility conditions (e.g. mist or fog) or at night under supervision.
    • Scouts can locate grid reference points on various terrains.
  8. I can use a topographical map to plan a hike in unfamiliar territory.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their skill by plotting a route through new territory.
  9. I can predict weather changes without the use of weather forecasts.
    • Scouts can recognize temperature changes, changes in wind speed and cloud formations, and use these and other indicators to predict the weather on their hiking activity.
  10. I can make changes to my group’s outing for safety reasons based on changing weather patterns that can occur during the activity.
    • Scouts can recognize temperature changes, changes in wind speed and cloud formations, and use these and other indicators to adjust the hiking activity’s length, duration, camp locations, etc.
  11. I can teach trail travel techniques for various trail types.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their expertise to others.
  12. I can teach appropriate trail etiquette to other Scouts.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their expertise to others.
  13. I can assess risk and be aware of group safety.
    • Scouts can complete a risk assessment for hiking expeditions.
    • Scouts can describe the limitations of their team members.
    • Scouts can make informed decisions about their participation based on various factors including: equipment, weather and skill level.
  14. I can plan escape routes.
    • Scouts can explain how severe weather or injury can change a hiking expedition and what they would do to incorporate a quick escape to safety or help while planning the expedition.
    • Scouts can identify escape or safety routes.
  15. I have participated in at least five hikes of various lengths.
    • Scouts will participate in various types of hikes and terrains different from those experienced for previous stages.
    • When possible, at least one hike can be to height over 1300 m.
  16. I have taken, planned and led one hike without a Scouter.
    • Scouts have acted as a leader in the planning and execution of a hike, within Scouts Canada procedures.
    • As part of normal operations, the plan will be discussed with the Group Committee prior to the hike.
  17. I have taken part in an unaccompanied but supervised two-night hike.
    • Scouts can hike with Scouters nearby to provide aid if necessary.
    • Each night’s camp can be in a different location on the route of the hike.
  18. I have written logs for all of these activities.
    • Scouts can add the details for these hikes including the location, route, weather, interesting points, etc. to their logbook.
  19. I can plan and lead an overnight hike.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their skills by leading the planning and execution of the overnight hike. Scouts can explain how they will make decisions off and on the trail, who and how the pace of the hike will be determined and how, how and when rest and water breaks will be decided.
  20. I can organise the transport required for an activity.
    • Scouts can participate in planning the transportation options such as rentals, buses, etc.
    • Scouts can discuss costs and benefits of their plans.
  21. I can research and find information about the hiking destination.
    • Scouts can use various methods to prepare for a hiking expedition including personal guides, guidebooks, internet, maps and trail books.
  22. I can create a budget for a hiking trip for my group.
    • Scouts can prepare for a hiking expedition, considering details including: cost to camp at the destination, water resources and other important information.


Trail Skills - Stage 8 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I can teach another youth how to pack for a hiking expedition.
    • Scouts can teach others how to pack their personal and group gear for a hiking expedition of more than two nights.
  2. I can make recommendations to improve group equipment.
    • Scouts can review group equipment and research alternatives to improve hiking experiences.
  3. I can navigate accurately and safely over rough terrain in any type of weather, and at night.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their expertise in hiking in poor visibility conditions (e.g. mist or fog) or at night under supervision.
    • Scouts can locate precise points or grid reference points on various terrains.
    • Time and accuracy to find the points are important.
  4. I can teach another youth how to plan a hike in unfamiliar territory using the appropriate tools.
    • Scouts can teach other youth how to find their position on a map and use their map skills to enter coordinates into a GPS unit so that they can navigate from that point to another on the hike.
    • Scouts can teach how to prepare a route by considering features shown on a topographic map.
  5. I can teach how to read weather patterns outdoors without the use of weather forecasts.
    • Scouts can explain and describe to other Scouts how temperature changes, changes in wind speed, cloud formations and other indicators can indicate the coming weather.
  6. I have completed a Wilderness First Aid course.
    • Scouts have completed certification in first aid in an outdoor setting where help is not immediately available.
  7. I can follow the procedures in the event of an accident.
    • Scouts can prepare a safety plan and can follow the plan directions.
  8. I have taken part in at least six hiking adventures of various lengths, two of which include overnight components.
    • Scouts can participate in various types of hikes and terrain different from those experienced in previous stages.
    • When possible, at least one hike can be to height over 1300 m.
  9. I can lead a hiking expedition of several nights.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their skills by leading the planning and execution of the hike.
  10. I can take responsibility for our group on a hiking adventure.
    • Scouts can take the lead position on a hiking adventure and demonstrate responsible actions including checks and measures for safety
  11. I have written logs for all of these activities.
    • Scouts add the details for these hikes including the location, route, weather, interesting points, etc. to their logbook.
  12. I can follow Scouts Canada procedures for a hiking trip.
    • Scouts access and complete Scouts Canada’s required forms for outings.

Trail Skills - Stage 9 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I know what equipment is required for various hiking expeditions and the correct use and care of this equipment.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their knowledge and competency in this area by discussing various situations and the types of equipment (including personal and group equipment) needed and used.
  2. I can be responsible for others in various situations on hiking expeditions longer than two nights.
    • Scouts can demonstrate their expertise by leading a number of hiking expeditions and have the confidence and leadership skills to lead a hiking expedition in various terrains.
  3. I can assess risk and take appropriate action to ensure safety.
    • Scouts can recognize the dangers that might be present and other safety considerations for hiking expeditions of various lengths.
    • Scouts can create a risk management control and safety plan.
  4. Where possible, I have taken part in and contributed to the planning of an expedition to 3250m.
    • Scouts can display high level of competency to participate in a high-altitude hiking expedition.
  5. I can practise basic winter hiking skills.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the preparation hiking and safety skills needed to hike in winter conditions.
  6. I have a logbook detailing at least 20 hikes and expeditions that I have undertaken since Stage 7.
    • Scouts can add the details for these hikes including the location, route, weather, interesting points, etc. to their logbook.
  7. I can create an exciting expedition while catering for everyone’s needs.
    • Scouts can lead the development of a hiking expedition for their own age group, as well as younger Scouts.
    • Scouts can discuss and assess the skill level of others and be aware of the challenges that may be encountered on a hiking expedition.
  8. I can budget, prepare and manage every aspect of the expedition without input from Scouters.
    • Scouts can use their knowledge from other expeditions to lead the financial planning and budgeting portion of a hiking expedition.