Winter Skills Stage 3

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Winter Skills - Stage 3 Competencies & Requirements

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  1. I have participated in a winter sport (alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, snowboarding, skating, hockey, tobogganing, sledding, curling).
    • With members of their Section, family or through school, Scouts will have participated in a winter sporting activity (such as one listed above).
    • It is not expected that Scouts will participate in a league or achieve a specific proficiency in the sport.
  2. I can light a small fire.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the ability to light a small fire in winter conditions.
    • The principles of Leave No Trace should be adhered to.
  3. I have helped plan a menu for a winter camp.
    • Scouts can work with members of their team to produce a balanced menu for a winter camp.
  4. I have cooked a lunch over an open fire.
    • Scouts can cook a simple meal over an open fire.
  5. I understand the layering principle when dressing for winter activities and apply it to all activities.
    • Scouts can explain the principles behind layering clothes (wicking, warmth and wind/wet) for winter activities and have an opportunity to demonstrate this skill.
    • Scouts understand what clothing fabrics are appropriate and are aware of less-expensive options.
  6. With a small group, I have built an emergency shelter in winter.
    • Scouts can build a simple emergency shelter with tarp, piece of plastic, snow or other easily-obtainable items and materials.
    • (At this stage it is not expected that Scouts will be able to produce an “expert” shelter; rather, they should have had an opportunity to work as a member of a team trying to build a simple shelter.)
  7. I know how to find shelter from the wind on a cold day.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the ability to find shelter from the wind when outdoors in winter conditions.
  8. I can pack a day pack for a winter outing.
    • Scouts can demonstrate the ability to pack a personal day pack for a winter outing.
  9. I know how to watch my fellow Scouts for signs of exposure to the cold.
    • Scouts can demonstrate how to identify signs of hypothermia and/or frostbite. (Please refer to the Field Book for Canadian Scouting.)
  10. I have spent one night at winter camp in a cabin or heated tent (in addition to requirements for previous stages).
    • Scouts can spend one night at a winter camp in a cabin or heated tent.
  11. I can identify the North Star and three other features in the winter night sky.
    • Scouts can identify the North Star as well as some of the constellations and/or planets in the winter night sky, and can describe why they can be valuable for navigation and culture.
  12. I have completed a winter hike of at least 3 km.
    • As part of their Section and/or Patrol, Scouts can complete a 3 km hike in winter conditions.
  13. I have made a winter survival kit that I take with me on all winter activities.
    • Scouts can make a winter survival kit that is suitable for all winter activities.
    • Scouts can explain why they have included the items in the kit and how each can be used in a winter emergency, and they can explain why other possible items are not included.
    • Scouts can describe possible scenarios (lost in the woods, stranded in a vehicle or cabin due to the weather) in which the kit could be used.
  14. In addition to previous stages, I have made a piece of winter gear or clothing.